Approaches and key components of person-centred care

Some of the key approaches and components in a system of care that is person-centred are:

 

Self-management support

Self-management support is the support given to people with long term conditions to enable them to manage the medical, emotional and social aspects of their health on a day-to-day basis.  It is a key component of a system of person-centred care as it enables people to manage their own health, and to personalise the care and support around them to best meet their needs.  
Read more about self-management support 

Shared Decision Making

Shared decision making is a collaborative process in which people are supported by their health professional to choose the treatment and care that is best for them.  It is a key component of a system of person-centred care as it ensures that care is truly personalised, as people are supported to determine the outcomes that are important to them and the best way to achieve them. 
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Digital health

Digital health is an umbrella term referring to a range of different technologies that can be used to support people’s health and care without them needing to visit a hospital, clinic or any other health or care setting.  Digital health is a key component of a system of person-centred care, as the technology and how it is used by each individual can be personalised to each person’s needs and preferences.  It also enables people to take more control of both their health (e.g. through self-monitoring) and their care (e.g. through the ability to book appointments online). 
Read more about digital health 

Health literacy

Health literacy is the term used to describe people’s ability to understand, access and use health information and services.  It is increasingly being viewed as a framework for understanding how competent organisations are at enabling and responding to the needs of the people they serve.  When understood in this way, it is a key component of person-centred care as it ensures that care is personalised to the needs of each individual.   
Read more about health literacy

Integrated Care

Integrated care takes the perspective of the person using services as the organising principle and aims to improve people’s care and experience through improved coordination.  The term includes: integration between health services, social services and other care providers (horizontal integration); care that is integrated across primary, community, hospital and tertiary care services (vertical integration); and care that is integrated within one sector (e.g. within mental health services through multi-professional teams or networks).   Integrated care is a key component of as system of person-centred care as it ensures that care is personalised to the needs of each individual and co-ordinated.
Read more on the King’s Fund website.

Personalised care and support planning

Care and support planning is a defined process which helps people with long term conditions to set their own aims, and then secures the support and care that are needed to achieve them. It is holistic in that it recognises that there are other issues, in addition to medical needs, that affect a person’s total health and well-being.  Personalised care and support planning is a key component of a system of care that is person-centred as it is both personalised and enabling
Read more on the RCGP website

Personal Health Budgets

A personal health budget is an amount of money to support the healthcare and wellbeing needs of a person, which is planned and agreed between the individual, or their representative, and the local clinical commissioning group (CCG).

At the heart of making personal health budgets work well is personalised care and support planning, which helps people to identify their health and wellbeing goals, together with their local NHS team, and set out how the budget will be spent to enable them to reach their goals and keep healthy and safe.
Read more on the NHS England website

Records access

People can use their health records in a number of ways, from checking test results to reminding themselves about what was discussed during an appointment. There is already evidence that people feel more confident and are better able to manage their own health when they have access to their own records.  It is a key component of a system of care that is person-centred as it enables people to better manage their own health.  
Read more on the NHS England website