Person-centred care made simple

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This guide seeks to provide a quick overview of person-centred care. This is not a ‘how to’ guide. Instead, it offers a clear explanation of the principles of person-centred care, why it is important, how it has developed, and some examples to help those considering putting person-centred care in to practice.  It is written for anyone interested in health and health care, including health care professionals and those who use the NHS.

 

The challenges facing the NHS are well understood. There are growing numbers of older people and people living with long-term conditions and disabilities. At the same time, health and social care budgets are under increasing pressure. If we are to provide high quality care that affords people the best possible quality of life, we need to rethink the relationship between people and the services that provide their care.

In person-centred care, health and social care professionals work collaboratively with people who use services. Person-centred care supports people to develop the knowledge, skills and confidence they need to more effectively manage and make informed decisions about their own health and health care. It is coordinated and tailored to the needs of the individual. And, crucially, it ensures that people are always treated with dignity, compassion and respect.

This guide seeks to provide a quick overview of person-centred care. This is not a ‘how to’ guide. Instead, it offers a clear explanation of the principles of person-centred care, why it is important, how it has developed, and some examples to help those considering putting person-centred care in to practice.

It is written for anyone interested in health and health care, including health care professionals and those who use the NHS.

You can order a free hard copy of  Person-centred care made simple from our main site.

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Comments

Back in 2007 our new CEO of NHS Cambridgeshire PCT introduced himself in the media as dedicated to patient-centred care. This gave me the confidence as an Allied Health Professional to approach him to carry out a survey through a local Older Peoples' Venture to determine the profile and needs of the older person. He readily gave consent and our trust went on to achieve a remarkable reconfiguration of services in the community. The Kings Fund had set this as a priority and we took the challenge up. Why is this approach now considered to be so radical?
by Margaret Coles
Person-centred care is a term people use too generally, a bit like integration. Whilst it is a laudable aim, the practicalities of it being achieved for certain client groups is at present not possible. Take a disable person for example, who may require a range of assistive technology - wheelchair, community equipment, major adaptations, telecare, telehealth, communication devices. This individual could end up having 8-10 different assessments for the different pieces of equipment. Each of the pieces of equipment come from different services, which don't communicate with one another. The individual may receive some pieces of equipment and not others. There are institutional silos in place which prevent the individual from having their holistic AT needs met. There needs to be a radical change where assistive technology is concerned where we can truly offer person-centred care.
by Brian Donnelly
Patients need to be taught how to look after their mental health, and the only NICE recommended way of doing this is the 8 week Mihdfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) course. I am running a campaign to empower GPs to prescribe a MBCT course as easily as Prozac. This involves a simple an quick procurement scheme to licence MBCT providers which sets standards and tariff prices. See paper 9.81 on www.reginaldkapp.org.
by John Kapp

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